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Detection of soybean by real-time PCR in the samples subjected to deep technological processing

https://doi.org/10.21323/2414-438X-2019-4-4-23-27

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Abstract

During deep technological processing, DNA of food product components (specifically, in canned foods) is subjected to strong degradation, which makes the PCR-based food components identification more difficult. In this work, a primer-probe system is proposed, which was selected for the multi-copy region of long terminal repeat (LTR) of soybean (Glycine max). We confirmed its high sensitivity and specificity for soybean detection by real-time PCR. Using the selected system, we successfully analyzed the samples of meat-and-plant canned foods and other food products subjected to deep technological processing — tofu, preserved tofu, soy sauces, confectionary products containing soy lecithin. To compare with these samples, real-time PCR was carried out using the primer-probe system selected for the single-copy le1 gene. In terms of sensitivity, the use of the primer-probe system specific to the single-copy region was significantly inferior to the primer-probe system specific to the LTR region. The difference in the rate of degradation of these genomic DNA regions of Glycine max was found.

About the Authors

K. A. Kurbakov
V. M. Gorbatov Federal Research Center for Food Systems of Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation
Konstantin A. Kurbakov — engineer of laboratory of hygiene of manufacture and microbiology, 109316, Moscow, Talalikhina str., 26. Tel: +7–495–676–60–11


E. A. Konorov
V. M. Gorbatov Federal Research Center for Food Systems of Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation
Evgenii A. Konorov — candidate of biological sciences, Senior researcher of Laboratory of molecular biology and bioinformatics, 109316, Moscow, Talalikhina str., 26. Tel: +7–495–676–60–11


V. N. Zhulinkova
V. M. Gorbatov Federal Research Center for Food Systems of Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation
Valentina N. Zhulinkova — engineer of laboratory of hygiene of manufacture and microbiology, 109316, Moscow, Talalikhina str., 26. Tel: +7(905)780–60–76


M. Yu. Minaev
V. M. Gorbatov Federal Research Center for Food Systems of Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation
Mihail Yu. Minaev — candidate of technical sciences, head of Laboratory of molecular biology and bioinformatics, 109316, Moscow, Talalikhina str., 26. Tel.: +7–495–676–60–11


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For citation:


Kurbakov K.A., Konorov E.A., Zhulinkova V.N., Minaev M.Yu. Detection of soybean by real-time PCR in the samples subjected to deep technological processing. Theory and practice of meat processing. 2019;4(4):23-27. https://doi.org/10.21323/2414-438X-2019-4-4-23-27

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ISSN 2414-438X (Print)
ISSN 2414-441X (Online)