Preview

Theory and practice of meat processing

Advanced search

Submissions

Online Submissions

Already have a Username/Password for Theory and practice of meat processing?
Go to Login

Need a Username/Password?
Go to Registration

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

Start submission
 

Author Guidelines

The journal publishes:

  • Original article
  • Review article
  • Short message

We kindly ask you to use American English spelling and punctuation conventions. The article should be typed in standard Times New Roman font, size 12, single-spaced with margins of 2 cm. The manuscript should contain no less than 10 pages in Microsoft Word text editor. The total volume of the manuscript should be at least 10 pages, about 40 thousand characters with spaces. This volume also includes an abstract, tables and figures. The volume of a review article  should exceed 40 thousand characters. The review article should contain a list of at least 50 references.

The volume of a short message  should exceed 10 thousand characters.

The body of your article should contain the following sections: introduction, study objects and methods, results and discussion, conclusion. Please observe the following volume ratio: Introduction – 1/5 of the total article volume; Study objects and methods – 1/5, Results and discussion + Conclusion – 3/5.

Figures and diagrams, preferably coloured, should be made in Microsoft Office and sent as separate excel files. Please make sure the figures could be improved by the editors if necessary.

It is highly recommended to use neat and precise language: avoid long complex or compound sentences and sophisticated constructions. The maximum sentence length should be 10–12, max.15 words. One paragraph should not exceed 10–12 laconic and clear sentences.

All manuscripts must follow the structural pattern specified below and match the Article Template

Start by indicating the type of your manuscript in the upper right corner (Original article, Review article, Short message).

1. Title (< 10 words). It should be informative and reflect the main results of the research. The title of the article should be in lowercase letters, with the exception of the first letter and proper names. Please avoid abbreviations.

2. First and last names of the authors, separated by commas. Paternal and middle names should be contracted to the first letter (E.g.: Ivan I. Ivanov). Paternal and middle names should be contracted to the first letter (E.g.: Ivan I. Ivanov). Spelling should coincide with your ORCID ID. Mind that you have to register in ORCID (https://orcid.org/). An ORCID ID is obligatory for each author. Please mark the name of the author responsible for correspondence with an asterisk*.

3. Affiliations: formal name of the institution, city, and country. The names and locations of institutions or companies should be given for all authors. If several institutions are listed, match the institution and the corresponding author with superscript numbers.

4. Key words: provide < 7 keywords identifying the subject and the result of the research. Remember that it is key words that enable your potential readers to find your article on the Internet.

Use AGROVOC  to choose English terms.

5. Abstract (200–250 words) cannot exceed 2,000 characters with spaces. The abstract should be original and informative. Please avoid meaningless introductory phrases and vague generalities. Keep in mind that the abstract is the main source of information about your research for most readers. Therefore, you want your abstract to reflect the main results of your research. Make sure it does not exaggerate your achievements. Your abstract should not contain any extra material absent from the article.  

The abstract should be structured according to the following  mandatory sections:

а) Introduction: state your research problem, relevancy, and objectives;

b) Objects and methods: describe the objects and stages of your study;

с) Results and discussion: describe the actual results achieved;

d) Conclusion: state the practical relevance and perspectives of your research.

Do not repeat the title in the opening part of your abstract. When specifying the place of research, mention the region or province.

Make the introductory part brief. Indicate the subject, topic, research objective only if they are not obvious from the title; mention the methods only if they are novel or are of particular interest.

Start the description of your research objective as “This research describes/features…”

Make sure the results are described accurately and informatively. Mention SPECIFIC information, conclusions, recommendations, etc.; present the main theoretical and experimental results, factual data, revealed relationships and patterns. Focus on new results and data of long-term value, important discoveries and data, conclusions that refute existing theories, etc.

Conclusions can include recommendations, assessments, proposals, or hypotheses described in the article.

Please avoid unnecessary introductory words and phrases (e.g., “the author of the article considers that ...”). Do not include historical references, generally known provisions, or review of previous publications unless they constitute the main part of this particular study.

You abstract should include key words from the text of the article.

Numerals are transmitted in numbers unless it is the opening word in the sentence.

You can use abbreviations (when a term of 2–3 words is replaced by a generally accepted abbreviation, in which the number of letters corresponds with the number of words in the full term). Give full term when it is used for the first time providing the abbreviation in brackets. If you use a lot of abbreviations, make a glossary at the end of the article.

6. Funding: Indicate who funded the research or publication by giving the official abbreviated name of the organization in brackets, the grant number, and its name. State the official abbreviated name of your employer if the study was performed as part of your routine work and did not receive additional funding. The Funding section is optional: if no financial support was involved, do not include this section.

7. Acknowledgements: this section is optional and contains expression of gratitude to those who contributed to the research.

8. Introduction: this part states the relevance of the research and gives a brief review of the publications related to the matter. Make sure your introduction contains a clear problem statement and reflects the objectives of your research. Referenced sources should be indexed in international scientific databases. In-text references should be given in square brackets and numbered [beginning with №1] in order of their appearance in the text. If several sources are quoted, they are given in chronological order.

9. Objects and methods

– Experimental research papers should contain a full description of the subject of the study, consecutive stages of the experiment, equipment, and reagents. Do not forget to specify the original company names of equipment and reagents manufacturers in brackets. If the method you use is not widely known or has been considerably modified, please provide a brief description.

– Theoretical research papers should specify objectives, approximations and assumptions, conclusions and equations. Please do not overload your text with intermediate data and description of well-known methods (such as numerical methods of solving equations) unless you have introduced some novelty into them.

– Review papers should indicate the methods of literature search, criteria for inclusion or exclusion, data sources and geographic information, as well as research subjects and analysis techniques.

10. Results and discussion: this section should provide a concise description of experimental data. Rather than repeating the data given in tables and graphs, the text should seek to reveal the principles detected. While describing your research results, it is recommended to use the Past Indefinite verb tense. The discussion should not reiterate the results. The discussion should contain an interpretation of the obtained research results (compliance of the results with the research hypothesis, generalization of the research results, suggestions for practical application and future research).

Each table should be made in MS Word (Table – Add Table) or MS Excel and contain no less than three columns. Provide a number and a title for each table.

The Journal publishes color photographs and diagrams. Mathematical equations should start with a separate line and be typed in the MathType frame as a whole.

Mind that it is not allowed to compile formulae from composite elements (e.g. one part of the formula is a table, another part is a text, and some other part is an embedded frame). Please maintain the common settings for fonts, the size of characters and their placement in MathType formulas. Please avoid manual change for individual symbols or formula elements (See the appendix).

11. Conclusion: briefly summarize the main results of your research. Naturally, the conclusion should contain the answer to the question posed by the introduction.

12. References. The references are given in the order of their appearance in the text. The list of references should include only peer-reviewed publications that you mention in your text.

Please avoid references to publications that are not readily available, e.g. institutional regulations, state standards, technical requirements, social and political newspapers and magazines, extended abstracts of dissertation, and dissertations. Make sure you do not textbooks, study manuals, unpublished works, proceedings of conferences. Please avoid citing publications that are more than 7 years old.

Self-citation should be well-justified and cannot exceed 10% of the references. Please make sure that at least 50% of the works you cite are less than 5 years old and published in periodicals registered in such data bases as Scopus, Web оf Science, etc.

Include articles published in leading scientific journals (consult the list for Food Science).

If you mention no references to fresh, 2–3-year-old papers and foreign authors, it might reduce your chances for publication. The references should reflect the actual impact of representatives of the international scientific community on the issue.

If the article has more than one author, their names are separated by commas. However, if there are more than six authors, put “et al” after the first six names. Do not capitalise each notional word in the title: only the first word and those words that are capitalised according to conventional spelling rules. Journal titles are not abbreviated. Start each reference with the year of publication. Volume number is separated with a semicolon, no spaces. The number of the issue is given in brackets; page numbers follow after a colon. If the publication cited has a digital identifier, give a link to the DOI after the colophon.

The journal "Theory and Practice of Meat Processing" uses the APA - American Psychological Association style of references when creating a bibliography. (https://apastyle.apa.org/?_ga=2.168062881.1644059737.1614325673-363239010.1614325673)

Examples:

1. Reference to a journal publication: 

Kim, T.-K., Yong, H.I., Kim, Y.-B., Kim, H.-W., Choi, Y.-S. (2019). Edible Insects as a Protein Source: A Review of Public Perception, Processing Technology, and Research Trends. Food Science of Animal Resources, 39(4), 521-540. https://doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2019.e53

2. Reference to a journal publication with an article number:

Gravel, A., Doyen, A. (2020). The use of edible insect proteins in food: Challenges and issues related to their functional properties. Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, 59, Article 102272. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ifset.2019.102272

3. Reference to a book:

Votava, M., Cerhnohorska, L., Heroldova, M., Hola, V., Mejzlikova, L., Ondrovcik, P., at al. (2003). Special Medical Microbiology.  Brno: Neptun. 237–365. (in Czech).

4. Reference to a chapter in an edited book:

Koopmans, M. (2012). Food-borne viruses from a global perspective. Chapter in a book: Improving Food Safety Through a One Health Approach: Workshop Summary. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US). 2012. A9.

5. Reference to a website:

WHO (World Health Organization). (2008). Viruses in food: Scientific advice to support risk management. Microbiological Risk Assessment Series, No. 13. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/foodsafety?/publications?/micro/mra13/en/index.html. Accessed January 20, 2020

6. Reference to a conference paper or poster presentation:

Abrahantes, J.C., Richardson, J., O’Mahony, M., Pare, A., Bruckers, L., Johne, R. et al. (2017, 14–18 May). European baseline survey of norovirus in oysters. Poster session presentation at the Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Safety (ICMSS), Galway, Ireland.

13. AUTHOR INFORMATION is follow:

Daniel J. Smith (First Author) – Academic degree, academic title, position, Department, University. University address.  Tel.: +1 -234-567-89-00 .E-mail: bbbbbbbb@ccccc.ru

ORCID: http://orcid.org/ 0000-1111-2222-3333

*corresponding author

Helen A. Henderson (Second Author) – Academic degree, academic title, position, Department, University. University address. Tel.: +1 -234-567-89-00. E-mail: aaaaaaaaaa@dddd.ru

ORCID: http://orcid.org/ 0000-2222-3333-44444

14. Conflicts of interests an equal contribution to the work:

All authors are responsible for the work and data presented.

All authors made an equal contribution to the work.

The authors were equally involved in writing the manuscript and are equally responsible for plagiarism.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The manuscripts are accepted if has not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere.
  2. The materials should be prepared in a format  Microsoft Word, RTF, or World Perfect.
  3. Internet links are provided as a complete URL.

  4. Text should be typed with an interval of one line spacing, font Times New Roman, 12 pt; to highlight the accents it is recommended to use italics rather than underlining (except Internet links). All images, graphics and tables are placed within the text according to the meaning of the particular part of text  (and not at the end of the document).
  5. The text must meet the stylistic and bibliographic requirements described in the Article Template

 

Copyright Notice

Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:

  1. Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.
  2. Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.
  3. Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See The Effect of Open Access).

 

Privacy Statement

Specified when registering the names and addresses will be used solely for technical purposes of a contact with the Author or reviewers (editors) when preparing the article for publication. Private data will not be shared with other individuals and organizations.